Outside.4.JPG

Troy Santos

United States
129 học viên đăng ký học

Giá 1 bài học: 229.000

:)
I live in Dà Nẫng and am looking for work online teaching adults and / or older teens. I wrote about my views on language learning yesterday and have attached it here. See what you think and get back to me if you want to. I wrote this as part of an application to teach at a company here called MTI Technology.

Số bài học
Giảm giá
10 Bài học
0%
40 Bài học
5%
80 Bài học
10%
120 Bài học
15%
360 Bài học
30%

Tổng tiền: 2.290.000 ₫


This is a brief description of my views on learning language and how I can help
learners improve their English. Some of this comes from personal experience while some
of this comes from studying experts who have more experience and insight than myself.
I’ll admit right off the bat that I’m not the best example of this complete strategy to
learning and teaching specifically, or to living my life more generally. Yet, I am genuinely
excited with this three-part approach to teaching, which is what I have to offer to MTI
Technology.
Many people believe that, for whatever reason, they cannot learn a language, that it’s
not useful for their lives, or that it takes too long. In fact, it doesn’t need to take years and
years. The trick is, it’s important to study intelligently. Seems to me that there is no one
way that works best for everyone, and that it depends mostly on learners’ character and
personal interests. Here are the three parts to my approach.
Personal foundation: Firstly, in general, I think it’s very useful for learners to have a
personal foundation regarding their learning. This means to 1) know what their long term
purpose is. Specifically, are they learning for business, for travel, for pleasure, etc? 2)
know their source and level of motivation. Are they internally motivated or externally
motivated? In other words, an internal motivation means they themselves want to learn.
This could be that they simply enjoy learning languages, Conversely, an example of
external motivation is a requirement of the company they’re working for. 3) do a SWOT
analysis. This doesn’t have to be extensive, but should include 1 or 2 items in each of the
4 areas of this analysis. There are endless possible studying approaches that learners
could create based on their SWOT analysis. One example, is to emphasize the positives,
and de-emphasize the negatives. 4) set SMART Goals, track them, and feel good about
meeting them. Learners should be careful to set goals that are consistent with the 5
principles of SMART goals, have a way to keep them in sight until they have been met,
and for maximum benefit, to feel good about having met them, perhaps rewarding
themselves for having met the goals. Though I don’t have formal training in any of these
areas of building a foundation, I am well-equipped to help with all of them.
Set of techniques: I have a strong hunch that most people who begin studying a
language, quit without getting much satisfaction from it. Also, though they might spend
years and years studying, they don’t learn as much as they’d like. I think a major reason
for this is they don’t know how to study – don’t have a set of techniques that work for
them. The standard learning techniques of traditional education (rote memorization and
drilling) works for many people, yet for many people is boring, and drives many people
away from learning a language. With so many free and cheap resources available through
internet, learning a language is more accessible than ever. One problem for (especially
beginning) learners is that they either aren’t aware of these resources, or there isn’t much
information available in their native language. I don’t know how much information on
language learning techniques is available in Vietnamese language, but I can teach these
techniques. Below are a few:
• shadowing for me, means pretty much the same as listen and repeat. In other
words, to listen closely and say as closely as possible what the learner hears, without
thinking for even a moment about what s/he has just heard. (For some people, this
technique means to listen and speak at the same time! I find this unconscionable!)
• mnemonics (in the case of language-learning) are techniques used to memorize
new vocabulary, phrases, or even whole sentences. There is a strong visual component

to these techniques. So the more vivid they are, and the more they evoke a strong
feeling in learners, the more effective they are.
• memory palace is a spatial imagery technique using mnemonics and visualization
as a memory tool. The difference between this and a mnemonic technique is that a
memory palace is a spatial imagined place that the learner knows well and imagines
moving through, and incorporates mnemonics.
• made-up conversations are conversations in a learner’s head while doing activities
alone. For example, while making coffee, s/he imagines being two different people, one
asking questions about making coffee, and the other answering the questions.
Real conversations: The absolutely most effective way to learn a language is to use it
in meaningful ways. There is nothing that can replace having someone to speak with. But

few people have easy access to native speakers so speaking with family, friends, co-
workers and others should be a part of one’s routine. Of course one of my roles is to

converse with students, but since we will have so little contact, learners must find
opportunities outside of our lessons to use the language meaningfully. Fortunately, with
internet, it is more possible than ever to have conversations with native speakers. Aside
from paid lessons with an enormous number of online companies, there are online
language exchange companies. Upon request, I’d be happy to discuss these possibilities
in more detail.
It is also fortunate that meaningful use of the language is possible through reading,
listening, and even writing. Any type of language use that stimulates and engages the
mind is meaningful. There are at least two websites for learners to practice listening to,
reading, and memorizing material that learners choose themselves, which ensures that
the content will be meaningful to the learner. One of the websites is freeware, while the
other allows beginners to learn for free, but which requires payment beyond the beginner
level. Also, there are flashcard websites using algorithms that are effective for memorizing
words, phrases, sentences, as well as non-language related memorization tasks.
Of course I realize that I have written very little about what I would do during a lesson
a lesson at MTI Technology. This is because I see the teacher’s role as secondary in the
process of learning a language. In addition to the usual teacher roles of motivating and
inspiring, modeling and correcting pronunciation and grammar, and providing exercises
and activities, I’ll do my best to provide useful lessons that incorporate shadowing,
meaningful conversation practice, and fun and interesting activities, while maximizing
students’ talking time and minimizing my own. In addition, I would like to include some
use of the various memory techniques.

This is a brief description of my views on learning language and how I can help
learners improve their English. Some of this comes from personal experience while some
of this comes from studying experts who have more experience and insight than myself.
I’ll admit right off the bat that I’m not the best example of this complete strategy to
learning and teaching specifically, or to living my life more generally. Yet, I am genuinely
excited with this three-part approach to teaching, which is what I have to offer to MTI
Technology.
Many people believe that, for whatever reason, they cannot learn a language, that it’s
not useful for their lives, or that it takes too long. In fact, it doesn’t need to take years and
years. The trick is, it’s important to study intelligently. Seems to me that there is no one
way that works best for everyone, and that it depends mostly on learners’ character and
personal interests. Here are the three parts to my approach.
Personal foundation: Firstly, in general, I think it’s very useful for learners to have a
personal foundation regarding their learning. This means to 1) know what their long term
purpose is. Specifically, are they learning for business, for travel, for pleasure, etc? 2)
know their source and level of motivation. Are they internally motivated or externally
motivated? In other words, an internal motivation means they themselves want to learn.
This could be that they simply enjoy learning languages, Conversely, an example of
external motivation is a requirement of the company they’re working for. 3) do a SWOT
analysis. This doesn’t have to be extensive, but should include 1 or 2 items in each of the
4 areas of this analysis. There are endless possible studying approaches that learners
could create based on their SWOT analysis. One example, is to emphasize the positives,
and de-emphasize the negatives. 4) set SMART Goals, track them, and feel good about
meeting them. Learners should be careful to set goals that are consistent with the 5
principles of SMART goals, have a way to keep them in sight until they have been met,
and for maximum benefit, to feel good about having met them, perhaps rewarding
themselves for having met the goals. Though I don’t have formal training in any of these
areas of building a foundation, I am well-equipped to help with all of them.
Set of techniques: I have a strong hunch that most people who begin studying a
language, quit without getting much satisfaction from it. Also, though they might spend
years and years studying, they don’t learn as much as they’d like. I think a major reason
for this is they don’t know how to study – don’t have a set of techniques that work for
them. The standard learning techniques of traditional education (rote memorization and
drilling) works for many people, yet for many people is boring, and drives many people
away from learning a language. With so many free and cheap resources available through
internet, learning a language is more accessible than ever. One problem for (especially
beginning) learners is that they either aren’t aware of these resources, or there isn’t much
information available in their native language. I don’t know how much information on
language learning techniques is available in Vietnamese language, but I can teach these
techniques. Below are a few:
• shadowing for me, means pretty much the same as listen and repeat. In other
words, to listen closely and say as closely as possible what the learner hears, without
thinking for even a moment about what s/he has just heard. (For some people, this
technique means to listen and speak at the same time! I find this unconscionable!)
• mnemonics (in the case of language-learning) are techniques used to memorize
new vocabulary, phrases, or even whole sentences. There is a strong visual component

to these techniques. So the more vivid they are, and the more they evoke a strong
feeling in learners, the more effective they are.
• memory palace is a spatial imagery technique using mnemonics and visualization
as a memory tool. The difference between this and a mnemonic technique is that a
memory palace is a spatial imagined place that the learner knows well and imagines
moving through, and incorporates mnemonics.
• made-up conversations are conversations in a learner’s head while doing activities
alone. For example, while making coffee, s/he imagines being two different people, one
asking questions about making coffee, and the other answering the questions.
Real conversations: The absolutely most effective way to learn a language is to use it
in meaningful ways. There is nothing that can replace having someone to speak with. But

few people have easy access to native speakers so speaking with family, friends, co-
workers and others should be a part of one’s routine. Of course one of my roles is to

converse with students, but since we will have so little contact, learners must find
opportunities outside of our lessons to use the language meaningfully. Fortunately, with
internet, it is more possible than ever to have conversations with native speakers. Aside
from paid lessons with an enormous number of online companies, there are online
language exchange companies. Upon request, I’d be happy to discuss these possibilities
in more detail.
It is also fortunate that meaningful use of the language is possible through reading,
listening, and even writing. Any type of language use that stimulates and engages the
mind is meaningful. There are at least two websites for learners to practice listening to,
reading, and memorizing material that learners choose themselves, which ensures that
the content will be meaningful to the learner. One of the websites is freeware, while the
other allows beginners to learn for free, but which requires payment beyond the beginner
level. Also, there are flashcard websites using algorithms that are effective for memorizing
words, phrases, sentences, as well as non-language related memorization tasks.
Of course I realize that I have written very little about what I would do during a lesson
a lesson at MTI Technology. This is because I see the teacher’s role as secondary in the
process of learning a language. In addition to the usual teacher roles of motivating and
inspiring, modeling and correcting pronunciation and grammar, and providing exercises
and activities, I’ll do my best to provide useful lessons that incorporate shadowing,
meaningful conversation practice, and fun and interesting activities, while maximizing
students’ talking time and minimizing my own. In addition, I would like to include some
use of the various memory techniques.

This is a brief description of my views on learning language and how I can help
learners improve their English. Some of this comes from personal experience while some
of this comes from studying experts who have more experience and insight than myself.
I’ll admit right off the bat that I’m not the best example of this complete strategy to
learning and teaching specifically, or to living my life more generally. Yet, I am genuinely
excited with this three-part approach to teaching, which is what I have to offer to MTI
Technology.
Many people believe that, for whatever reason, they cannot learn a language, that it’s
not useful for their lives, or that it takes too long. In fact, it doesn’t need to take years and
years. The trick is, it’s important to study intelligently. Seems to me that there is no one
way that works best for everyone, and that it depends mostly on learners’ character and
personal interests. Here are the three parts to my approach.
Personal foundation: Firstly, in general, I think it’s very useful for learners to have a
personal foundation regarding their learning. This means to 1) know what their long term
purpose is. Specifically, are they learning for business, for travel, for pleasure, etc? 2)
know their source and level of motivation. Are they internally motivated or externally
motivated? In other words, an internal motivation means they themselves want to learn.
This could be that they simply enjoy learning languages, Conversely, an example of
external motivation is a requirement of the company they’re working for. 3) do a SWOT
analysis. This doesn’t have to be extensive, but should include 1 or 2 items in each of the
4 areas of this analysis. There are endless possible studying approaches that learners
could create based on their SWOT analysis. One example, is to emphasize the positives,
and de-emphasize the negatives. 4) set SMART Goals, track them, and feel good about
meeting them. Learners should be careful to set goals that are consistent with the 5
principles of SMART goals, have a way to keep them in sight until they have been met,
and for maximum benefit, to feel good about having met them, perhaps rewarding
themselves for having met the goals. Though I don’t have formal training in any of these
areas of building a foundation, I am well-equipped to help with all of them.
Set of techniques: I have a strong hunch that most people who begin studying a
language, quit without getting much satisfaction from it. Also, though they might spend
years and years studying, they don’t learn as much as they’d like. I think a major reason
for this is they don’t know how to study – don’t have a set of techniques that work for
them. The standard learning techniques of traditional education (rote memorization and
drilling) works for many people, yet for many people is boring, and drives many people
away from learning a language. With so many free and cheap resources available through
internet, learning a language is more accessible than ever. One problem for (especially
beginning) learners is that they either aren’t aware of these resources, or there isn’t much
information available in their native language. I don’t know how much information on
language learning techniques is available in Vietnamese language, but I can teach these
techniques. Below are a few:
• shadowing for me, means pretty much the same as listen and repeat. In other
words, to listen closely and say as closely as possible what the learner hears, without
thinking for even a moment about what s/he has just heard. (For some people, this
technique means to listen and speak at the same time! I find this unconscionable!)
• mnemonics (in the case of language-learning) are techniques used to memorize
new vocabulary, phrases, or even whole sentences. There is a strong visual component

to these techniques. So the more vivid they are, and the more they evoke a strong
feeling in learners, the more effective they are.
• memory palace is a spatial imagery technique using mnemonics and visualization
as a memory tool. The difference between this and a mnemonic technique is that a
memory palace is a spatial imagined place that the learner knows well and imagines
moving through, and incorporates mnemonics.
• made-up conversations are conversations in a learner’s head while doing activities
alone. For example, while making coffee, s/he imagines being two different people, one
asking questions about making coffee, and the other answering the questions.
Real conversations: The absolutely most effective way to learn a language is to use it
in meaningful ways. There is nothing that can replace having someone to speak with. But

few people have easy access to native speakers so speaking with family, friends, co-
workers and others should be a part of one’s routine. Of course one of my roles is to

converse with students, but since we will have so little contact, learners must find
opportunities outside of our lessons to use the language meaningfully. Fortunately, with
internet, it is more possible than ever to have conversations with native speakers. Aside
from paid lessons with an enormous number of online companies, there are online
language exchange companies. Upon request, I’d be happy to discuss these possibilities
in more detail.
It is also fortunate that meaningful use of the language is possible through reading,
listening, and even writing. Any type of language use that stimulates and engages the
mind is meaningful. There are at least two websites for learners to practice listening to,
reading, and memorizing material that learners choose themselves, which ensures that
the content will be meaningful to the learner. One of the websites is freeware, while the
other allows beginners to learn for free, but which requires payment beyond the beginner
level. Also, there are flashcard websites using algorithms that are effective for memorizing
words, phrases, sentences, as well as non-language related memorization tasks.
Of course I realize that I have written very little about what I would do during a lesson
a lesson at MTI Technology. This is because I see the teacher’s role as secondary in the
process of learning a language. In addition to the usual teacher roles of motivating and
inspiring, modeling and correcting pronunciation and grammar, and providing exercises
and activities, I’ll do my best to provide useful lessons that incorporate shadowing,
meaningful conversation practice, and fun and interesting activities, while maximizing
students’ talking time and minimizing my own. In addition, I would like to include some
use of the various memory techniques.1

Đánh giá

Chưa có đánh giá nào.

Be the first to review “Troy Santos”

Thư điện tử của bạn sẽ không được hiển thị công khai. Các trường bắt buộc được đánh dấu *